My Creative Process

 

Basing my arguments on physical rationality, I’m always trying to pursue ideals of simplifying complexity that integrate novel hardware and data processes in ways that improve humans’ interactions with themselves and their environment. While keeping up to-date with academic journals and tech-news around the world is foundational to my creative process, what really allows me to apply my imagination and generate good ideas requires some further care and attentiveness. For example, I try to be positive, mindful and take notice of any quiet signals in my brain, or “weak activations” as they are called, for new insights or ideas worth pursuing further.

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After identifying something that has potential originality and meaningfulness, I usually first must go and talk to people. I talk to people in my team, or people who I trust, and try to question my hypothesis over a cup of coffee or tea. I listen and entertain related ideas and alternatives and try to identify bigger problems or see the bigger picture. The first step is therefore quite distributed. A collaborative process of communal sense making and thought stirring. The next step in my creative process usually involves scribbling down some notes, thoughts and sketches on the back of the many unused printouts that tend to pile-up at the side of my desk. These are notes and papers that I will later recycle. At this stage in the process, I like the fact that I’m working on scrap paper as it gives me that extra freedom for unstructured, unbounded and unregretful exploration – I hate wasting paper. I then sleep on it in order to facilitate insightful reasoning or boost creative functions through dreams.

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The final step in my creative process is the write-up, usually in LaTex format, a high-quality typesetting system that includes features that are designed for the production of technical and scientific documentation. Here, I chose my words judiciously such that they are both accurate in describing the purpose, function, and reasoning of my invention, but also, I chose my words such that they instil an expansive character to my text, thus encouraging the reader to pause and think of the implications and potential impact of what is being proposed.

 
Orestis Georgiou